Tundra Swan Photos © Bill Schmoker

All photographs copyrighted by the author. Publication-quality 300dpi versions and prints of many of the images contained in this web site are available- inquiries welcomed- email bill@schmoker.org

Trumpeter and Tundra Swans can be difficult to separate in the field when seen alone, distantly, or under other difficult circumstances. For some excellent ID tips, see David Sibley's swan ID notes.

Impressive gathering of 17 Tundra Swans, Union Reservoir, Weld County, Colorado, 11/26/06.

Adult Tundra Swans, Fentress Lake, Boulder County, Colorado, 11/04. This pair was present along with a juvenile Tundra Swan.

Adult Tundra Swan, Fentress Lake, Boulder County, Colorado, 11/04. Note the extensive yellow lores- near the maximum seen on this species.

Adult Tundra Swan, Fentress Lake, Boulder County, Colorado, 11/04. This is a more typical amount of yellow in the lores.

Juvenile Tundra Swan, Fentress Lake, Boulder County, Colorado, 11/04. There isn't any yellow in the lores yet, but you can see the pale area where yellow will likely develop.

1st cycle Tundra Swans, Strauss Cabin Lake, Larimer County, Colorado, 3/04.

1st cycle Tundra Swan, Strauss Cabin Lake, Larimer County, Colorado, 3/04. Note yellow lores on this individual.

1st cycle Tundra Swan, Strauss Cabin Lake, Larimer County, Colorado, 3/04. Note that this individual shows white lores.

1st cycle Tundra Swans & Canada Goose, Strauss Cabin Lake, Larimer County, Colorado, 3/04.

Juvenile Tundra Swan, Lake Ogalalla, Nebraska, 2/17/03. Note the concave upper bill profile. (A comparison of this bird with an adult Trumpeter Swan can be seen by clicking here, with the size difference, bill structure difference, etc. directly comparable.)

Another shot of the Juvenile Tundra(?) Swan, Lake Ogalalla, Nebraska, 2/17/03.

All photographs copyrighted by the author. Publication-quality 300dpi versions and prints of many of the images contained in this web site are available- inquiries welcomed- email bill@schmoker.org