2006 World Series of Birding

Team Double Exposure

On May 13, 2006, Team Double Exposure competed in the World Series of Birding (in photo below, from left: Jeff Bouton, David La Puma, and Bill Schmoker) Entered in the newly-formed digiscoping category, our goal was to photograph at least 100 species through our spotting scopes on the big day. By the 10pm deadline to turn in our review CD of photos we had surpassed our goal, tallying 102 photo-identifiable species.

photo © Jeffrey Gordon

Because different birds in different settings present unique photography challenges, we had three modes of digiscoping (defined in the WSB rules as photographing birds through a spotting scope.) The first was the traditional method of using a digital point-and-shoot camera held to the scope's eyepiece (both by hand and using adapters.) The second was using a DSLR with a 50mm f/1.8 lens to photograph birds through the scope's eyepiece. The final method was to hand-hold a 62mm scope connected to a DSLR using a photo adapter (but no eyepiece.) This method worked well for situations like flight shots or for small, nervous birds in nearby foliage. The challenge of this method was the loss of autofocus and metering capabilities.

photo © Jeffrey Gordon

We would like to thank Leica Sport Optics for sponsoring our entry into the 2006 WSB, and for providing scopes and adapters for our effort.

photo © Jeffrey Gordon

Below is our bird list, with each species name linked to the image that was submitted for ID approval. On our big day, we submitted the unedited originals (there wasn't time to do any processing other than selecting which images to submit.) These have been edited for size, composition, and levels. While many are of just "record shot" quality, others are kind of nice. I've highlighted these "best-of" our big day shots.

All bird photos below © Jeff Bouton, David La Puma, or Bill Schmoker

1. Mute Swan
2. Brant
3. Canada Goose
4. Gadwall
5. American Black Duck
6. Mallard
7. Green-winged Teal
8. Surf Scoter
9. White-winged Scoter
10. Black Scoter
11. Ruddy Duck
12. Common Loon
13. Northern Gannett
14. Double-crested Cormorant
15. Great Blue Heron
16. Great Egret
17. Snowy Egret
18. Black-crowned Night-Heron
19. Glossy Ibis
20. Black Vulture
21. Turkey Vulture
22. Osprey
23. Red-tailed Hawk
24. Peregrine Falcon
25. Clapper Rail
26. Black-bellied Plover
27. Semipalmated Plover
28. Piping Plover
29. Killdeer
30. American Oystercatcher
31. Greater Yellowlegs
32. Willet
33. Spotted Sandpiper
34. Ruddy Turnstone
35. Red Knot
36. Sanderling
37. Semipalmated Sandpiper
38. Least Sandpiper
39. Purple Sandpiper
40. Dunlin
41. Short-billed Dowitcher
42. Laughing Gull
43. Herring Gull
44. Great Black-backed Gull
45. Forster's Tern
46. Least Tern
47. Black Skimmer
48. Mourning Dove
49. Rock Pigeon
50. Yellow-billed Cuckoo
51. Chimney Swift
52. Ruby-throated Hummingbird
53. Red-bellied Woodpecker
54. Downy Woodpecker
55. Hairy Woodpecker
56. Eastern Wood-Pewee
57. Acadian Flycatcher
58. Eastern Phoebe
59. Eastern Kingbird
60. White-eyed Vireo
61. Red-eyed Vireo
62. Purple Martin
63. Tree Swallow
64. Bank Swallow
65. Barn Swallow
66. Fish Crow
67. Carolina Chickadee
68. Tufted Titmouse
69.House Wren
70. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
71. Veery
72. Wood Thrush
73. American Robin
74. Gray Catbird
75. Northern Mockingbird
76. Brown Thrasher
77. European Starling
78.Cedar Waxwing
79. Yellow-throated Warbler
80. Prairie Warbler
81. Black-and-white Warbler
82. Prothonotary Warbler
83. Ovenbird
84. Common Yellowthroat
85. Hooded Warbler
86. Scarlet Tanager
87. Chipping Sparrow
88. Field Sparrow
89. Nelson's Sharp-tailed Sparrow
90. Seaside Sparrow
91. Song Sparrow
92. White-throated Sparrow
93. Northern Cardinal
94. Indigo Bunting
95. Bobolink
96. Red-winged Blackbird
97. Boat-tailed Grackle
98. Common Grackle
99. Brown-headed Cowbird
100. Orchard Oriole
101. House Finch
 
 
 
102. House Sparrow

photo © Jeffrey Gordon

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